comparison - William Quartner Cornell University First Year...

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William Quartner Cornell University First Year Writing Seminar February 11, 2007 The Nature of Nature “I remembered from boarding school,” Hans Schnier recounts, “A padre there had once explained to us that cabbage was supposed to suppress sensuality. I find the idea of suppressing mine or anyone else’s sensuality disgusting” (Boll 64). Reading this sentence with the concept of human nature in mind provides significant insight into the persona of Hans Schnier. “Sensuality”, for example, should be interpreted as incorporating more than simply a person’s desires for sensual pleasures. “Sensuality” is a direct product of nature, and in the above sentence, it represents a person’s instincts and intuitions. Thus Hans finds the idea of suppressing his gut feelings and beliefs “disgusting”. Moreover, it is important to note that this idea of suppressing sensuality is provided to Hans by a member of the Catholic clergy. From this it is easy to extrapolate that Hans doesn’t quite agree with the Church on many issues because they violate his natural intuitions. Eichendorff’s Good-for-nothing, as well, finds refuge in nature. “It was so
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comparison - William Quartner Cornell University First Year...

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