Companies oen bypass nap nap nap nap colocahon

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Networks 10.x.x.x Firewall 10.6.6.6 198.3.3.3 Corpora8on X Internet Suppor8ng road warrior Employee working remotely with assigned IP address 198.3.3.3 Wants to appear to rest of corpora2on as if working internally From address 10.6.6.6 Gives access to internal services (e.g., ability to send mail) Virtual Private Network (VPN) Overlays private network on top of regular Internet Carnegie Mellon A Programmer's View of the Internet Hosts are mapped to a set of 32-bit IP addresses 128.2.203.179 The set of IP addresses is mapped to a set of iden8fiers called Internet domain names 128.2.203.179 is mapped to www.cs.cmu.edu A process on one Internet host can communicate with a process on another Internet host over a connecHon Carnegie Mellon IP Addresses 32-bit IP addresses are stored in an IP address struct IP addresses are always stored in memory in network byte order (big-endian byte order) True in general for any integer transferred in a packet header from one machine to another. E.g., the port number used to iden2fy an Internet connec2on. /* Internet address structure */ struct in_addr { unsigned int s_addr; /* network byte order (big-endian) */ }; Useful network byte-order conversion func8ons ("l" = 32 bits, "s" = 16 bits) htonl: convert uint32_t from host to netwo...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 04/06/2013 for the course ECE 18213 taught by Professor John during the Spring '13 term at Carnegie Mellon.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online