5696993 Manifest destiny.docx - Surname1 Student\u2019s Name Instructor\u2019s Name Course Date Manifest Destiny and Disunion Undeniably President Polk played

5696993 Manifest destiny.docx - Surname1 Studentu2019s...

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Surname1 Student’s Name Instructor’s Name Course Date Manifest Destiny and Disunion Undeniably, President Polk played a significant role in provoking the war with Mexicans in 1846. In 1845 during his early days in office, California's acquisition was one of his main agendas. Many historians identify Polk as a typical representation of the expansionist impulse recognized for the manifest destiny. Tension grew between America and Mexico in the 1840s as the United States expansionist frontrunners targeted the Mexican land to the western side, including California's northern province. Therefore, such a desire to conquer the province was one of the significant factors that provoked the war. As a matter of fact, in 1842, the United States naval troop, who miscalculated the war, had begun to seize the Monterey (California), which was part of Mexico. However, the following day Monterey was returned, but the attempt created increased uneasiness and tension on how the Mexican perceived their neighbours. The expansion forces could not be accommodated, making the American elect James Polk in 1844 because he promised to deliver more land. The president kept his words by capturing Oregon and hence provoked the war. Hence Polk played a central role in provoking the war. The treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which took effect in 1848, ended the Mexican-American war. The treaty favoured the Americans, which was not fair to the Mexicans, hence threatening the civil war. The war had commenced two years earlier in 1846, over a territorial dispute in Texas's ownership. The treaty's effects included the addition of 525,000 miles to the US possession, including the square miles that makes up present-day Nevada, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, Wyoming, California, and Utah. Besides, Mexico was prompted to forgo all claims on such territories and recognized the Rio Grande as the southern border. The treaty was defeated with a significant margin in the United States Congress since its effects would impact free slave states and the free state's balance between the southerners and the northerners hence threatening and risking war with Mexico, which was already antagonistic with America. However, before quitting office and President Polk's barking, Zachary Taylor managed to strike a congressional consensus. While Mexico did follow with the civil war's actual threat, the relation between them and the US remained tense over border disputes, hence threatening the civil war. The question and concerns over slavery were mainly perceived as a southern issue due to ownership of large plantations and agricultural fields.

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