10 - Spanish Period.pdf - THE SPANISH PARAGUA The Coming of...

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THE SPANISH PARAGUA The Coming of the Conquistadores “this island can be called as "The Land of Promise' where sources of life can be found and saved us from severe starvation." - Antonio Pigafetta, First Voyage around the World, B&R 1492-18981 Objectives: In this Lesson, readers are expected to: a. trace salient events on the dawn of Spanish colonization in the islands; b. describe geographic and cultural changes in Palawan through historical data; c. Analyze the contribution of Spanish in the province through products of culture; d. Relate evidences of colonization to present heritage as to its purpose and function. Let' Begin Before the entry of Spaniards and continuing through almost the entire period of their occupation, the territories of the province were persistently under the influenced of Islamized people from Borneo and the Sulu Archipelago. A glimpse of Tagbanua, Palawan and Molbog society and culture reveals Muslim dominance and influence in material culture and social organization, apparently a consequence of trading activities in south and central Palawan that persisted until the second half of the nineteenth century. The difficulty in colonizing these places, according to Eduardo Quisimbing , was places "came under the Muslim influence of the Muslim influence since 1200. Palawan was then known as Palau after a common and abundant aroid plant gr undant aroid plant growing along the seashore”. Early Chinese traders named Palau'yu which means safe harbor" and Paragua meaning "umbrella" 1
The expedition of Ferdinand Magellan brought to the many historical accoun ts whic h paved to the introduction of history of many places in the country. Sometime of June/July of 1521, when Antonio Pigafetta and the rest of the troop of Magellan (after his death and defeat from Lapu-Lapu) during its search for provision and voyage back to Spain, found an island and he called it, "Pulaoan" This huge island is rich in many food sources like rice, ginger, swine, goats, chicken, coconut, sweet potatoes, cane and bananas that would reach to three feet long. The abundant sources of the island have saved the troop from severe hunger, hence, called it as "The Land of Promise". Portraits of Antonio Pigafetta and Ferdinand Magellan (Source: Marasca Collection. Biblioteca Bertoliana of Vicenza) The encounter in Pulaoan is not complete without mentioning what Pigafetta said of the native of Palawan. He wrote, "Those people of Pulaoan go naked as do the others. Almost all of them cultivate their fields. They have blowpipes with thick wooden arrows more than one palm long, tipped with points and are poisoned.” Moreover, “They place a value of brass rings and chains, bells, knives and still more on copper pertain veneration that they have to and very tame cocks, which they do not eat because them" (Blair and Robertson II).

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