Battleship pOTEMKIN - Benjamin Tack Eisenstein Editing...

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Benjamin Tack4/14/13Eisenstein Editing Emerges Editing can make a viewer feel as if they are really present in the scene of the shot. The editing can provide the feelings, the spatial proxemics, the timeline, and the plot. The fluidness and clearness of a film usually depends on the continuity of the editing. However, Sergei Eisenstein, director of Battleship Potemkin, uses non-continuity editing to depict fluidness, but mostly to add suspense. The unorthodox way Eisenstein edited the film makes the viewer sit on the edge of the seat, waiting for the next piece of the puzzle to fit in to the entire story. The most common way of cutting a movie is using continuity editing, yet the non-continuity editing of Battleship Potemkin achieves the same goal as continuity editing, but does it in a way to build anticipation and expectation. Eisenstein did not conform to the norms of regular cinema, and in doing so, created a style of film that shattered the limits of editing.The system of cutting to maintain clear narrative action is called continuity editing. This form of editing relies on matching from shot to shot. In each shot, screen direction is consistent, position of characters and their eye lines, temporal relations, and spatial relations are consistent. The main rule of continuity editing is to make everything

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