Chapter-2-EEd-312.docx - Chapter II Development of Poetry...

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Chapter IIDevelopment of Poetry for ChildrenIntroduction This chapter is intended to help you know and learn the features of nurseryrhymes and the values found in these rhymes. Here, you will understand why there is aneed for children to be guided properly on what they see, listen to and watch. Also,poetry and its classifications will be presented along with some examples for children. Tabula Rasa: Children’s minds are likened to a blank slate, and that allknowledge comes from experience and perception. Whatever is fed in a child’s mind willbe recorded there like writing in a clean sheet. Learning tasks and examples are provided for enjoyment and appreciation of thecourse.Learning Outcomesa.Appreciate the importance of teaching nursery rhymes and poetry tochildren.b.Identify appropriate easy to learn nursery rhymes and poetry.c.Express thoughts, feelings and imaginations in creative activities like drawing, clay modeling, and paintingd.Express the meaning and rhythm of a poem in pantomime or interpretative dance.e.Create a learning material using poetry.Learning ContentMother Goose Rhymes/Nursery RhymesA. DefinitionA nursery rhyme is a traditional poem or song for children in Britain and manyother countries, but usage of the term only dates from the late 18th/early 19th century.The term Mother Goose rhymes is interchangeable with nursery rhymes.A Brief HistoryFrom the mid-16th century nursery rhymes begin to be recorded in English plays,and most popular rhymes date from the 17th and 18th centuries. The first Englishcollections, Tommy Thumb's Song Bookand a sequel, Tommy Thumb's Pretty Song
Book, were published by Mary Cooper in 1744. Publisher John Newbery's stepson,Thomas Carnan, was the first to use the term Mother Goose for nursery rhymes whenhe published a compilation of English rhymes, Mother Goose's Melody, or, Sonnets forthe Cradle(London, 1780).The oldest children's songs of which we have records are lullabies, intended tohelp a child fall asleep. Lullabies can be found in every human culture. The English termlullaby is thought to come from "lu, lu" or "la la" sounds made by mothers or nurses tocalm children, and "by by" or "bye bye", either another lulling sound or a term for goodnight. Until the modern era lullabies were usually only recorded incidentally in writtensources. B. Qualities of Nursery RhymesChildren who know nursery rhymes develop a strong sense of well-being. Timepasses pleasantly and they “feel good” and are happy with themselves. Children who know nursery rhymes are overflowing with self-confidence and self-esteem. They are curious and imaginative and can show off their ability to recite or singa rhyme with deep satisfaction and from memory. The rhymes come alive with thecreative use of their voice, eyes, facial expression and body language. Children whohave nursery rhymes read or sung to them become effective communicators.

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