Paper 3 - Nick Blossom Paper 3 on His Excellency Page 143...

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Nick Blossom Paper 3 on His Excellency, Page 143 Ellis uses the passage on page 143 to express the profound nature of Washington's actions following the American Revolution. In addition to it being possibly the greatest moment in American history, Ellis points out that Washington's refusal to become a monarch also showed a deep understanding of republicanism and of his own goals. Ellis wrote this passage intending to educate his readers about why Washington did this and how important that was. While he concedes that Washington "did not agree with the versions of republicanism that emphasized the elimination of executive power altogether," Ellis asserts that "At the Ideological level, Washington . . . understood the core principle of republicanism, that all legitimate power derived from the consent of the public." (p.143) His own life goal was to be remembered in the future, and through the passage on page 143, we see that he attained that goal by refusing to become king. "[I]f Washington resisted the
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Paper 3 - Nick Blossom Paper 3 on His Excellency Page 143...

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