week 05 (modern revisions)

week 05 (modern revisions) - SOCIOLOGY 3683: WEALTH, POWER,...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style SOCIOLOGY 3683: MODERN REVISIONS
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Modern Functionalism Kingsley Davis Wilbert Moore
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Modern Functionalism The Davis-Moore hypothesis the ubiquity of stratification the “motivational problem” positions that are (a) most important, and (b) hardest to fill (i.e., require training/talent), offer highest rewards (wealth and prestige)
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Modern Functionalism Talcott Parsons
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Modern Functionalism Stratification is based on status ranking People strive for status more than wealth wealth and income are only symbols of status achievement The Davis-Moore hypothesis 2.0 (status version) most important positions carry high status to help ensure that they are filled
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Modern Functionalism Importance of positions determined by each society’s dominant values Dominant values determined by primary institution in each society economic ( A daptation) political ( G oal attainment) cultural ( I ntegration) social ( L atent pattern maintenance)
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Modern Functionalism Parsons’ AGIL theory Institution Function Economic (work, occupation) Extract resources and produce goods and services Political (state, organization) Define goals and provide direction for attaining goals Cultural (law, religion) Integrate people into society through rules/moral standards Social (education, family) Train/socialize people to become functional members of society
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Modern Functionalism Parsons’ AGIL theory Institution Function Economic (work, occupation) Extract resources and produce goods and services Political (state, organization) Define goals and provide direction for attaining goals Cultural (law, religion) Integrate people into society through rules/moral standards Social (education, family) Train/socialize people to become functional members of society
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Modern Functionalism Parsons’ AGIL theory Institution Function Economic (work, occupation) Extract resources and produce goods and services Political (state, organization) Define goals and provide direction for attaining goals Cultural (law, religion) Integrate people into society through rules/moral standards Social (education, family) Train/socialize people to become functional members of society
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Modern Functionalism Parsons’ AGIL theory Institution Function Economic (work, occupation) Extract resources and produce goods and services Political (state, organization) Define goals and provide direction for attaining goals Cultural (law, religion) Integrate people into society through rules/moral standards Social (education, family) Train/socialize people to become functional members of society
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Modern Functionalism Parsons’ AGIL theory Institution Function Economic (work, occupation) Extract resources and produce goods and services Political (state, organization) Define goals and provide direction for attaining goals Cultural (law, religion) Integrate people into society through rules/moral standards Social (education, family) Train/socialize people to become functional members of society
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course SOC 3683 taught by Professor Clark during the Spring '08 term at The University of Oklahoma.

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week 05 (modern revisions) - SOCIOLOGY 3683: WEALTH, POWER,...

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