week 06, 07 (the upper class)

week 06, 07 (the upper class) - Click to edit Master...

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Unformatted text preview: Click to edit Master subtitle style SOCIOLOGY 3683: WEALTH, POWER, & PRESTIGE The upper class Describing the Upper Class Refers to small fraction (< 1%) of population Refers to families whose members are descendants of successful individuals Carnegie, Du Pont, Rockefeller, Vanderbilt new money is suspect: John D. Rockefeller initially rejected by some elites wealth generated quickly is considered dirty movie stars, athletes, lottery winners often excluded from elite social circles most members are unknown to outsiders Social Closure No official aristocracy in U.S. However, upper class actively forms exclusive societies social contact and marriage are typically restricted to elite circle of families status-inconsistent persons are not welcome (e.g., Beverly hillbillies) Social Closure Participation in elite institutions indicates upper class membership exclusive clubs, expensive private schools, debutante balls, high-status charities membership by invitation membership signifies family pedigree and hereditary social status group solidarity produces strong class consciousness Social Closure Attending Ivy League schools is common for upper class (e.g., Harvard, Yale, Princeton) Ivy League schools have increasingly admitted high-achieving commoners problem: upper class identification solution: exclusive fraternities (a.k.a., secret societies, like Skull and Bones) Social Closure The Social Register keeping track of whos who in high society membership requires sponsorship from five current members former members have been dropped due to scandal, divorce, pursuing undesirable careers, marrying outside of class, marrying movie stars The Social Register Privilege, Power, and Place: The Geography of the American Upper Class by Stephen Higley (1995) 32,398 households were listed in the 1988 edition of the Social Register 20% listed a second home 1% listed a third home six listed a fourth home The Social Register Social Register homes are geographically concentrated in several states The top 10 states have over 75% of all first homes listed in the Social Register State State (1) New York 5838 (6) Florida 1689 (2) Pennsylvania 4200 (7) Maryland 1629 (3) Massachusetts 3231 (8) New Jersey 1168 (4) California 2517 (9) Illinois 989 (5) Connecticut 2244 (10) Virginia 927 The Social Register Number of First Homes Listed in the Social Register per 100,000 people, by State (1988) State State State D.C. 144.82 Delaware 31.65 Wyoming 9.25 Connecticut 68.58 New Hampshire 31.41 South Carolina 8.88 Massachusetts 54.03 Rhode Island 28.90 California 8.84 Vermont 51.11 Virginia 15.36 Illinois 8.68 Pennsylvania 35.46 Missouri 15.31 Ohio 8.25 Maryland 34.97 New Jersey 15.14 Arizona 6.73 New York 32.54 Florida 13.72 Hawaii 5.09 Maine 32.31 Colorado 9.41 New Mexico 5.03 The Social Register...
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course SOC 3683 taught by Professor Clark during the Spring '08 term at The University of Oklahoma.

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week 06, 07 (the upper class) - Click to edit Master...

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