16_pluralism__outline - A RCHITECTUR E 151 LECTURE OUTLINES P LURALISM W INTER 2013 THE LATE 20TH AND EARLY 21ST CENTURY The architecture of the 1990s

16_pluralism__outline - A RCHITECTUR E 151 LECTURE OUTLINES...

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Unformatted text preview: A RCHITECTUR E 151: LECTURE OUTLINES P LURALISM: W INTER 2013 THE LATE 20TH AND EARLY 21ST CENTURY The architecture of the 1990s through to the 21st century had many influences, styles and themes. One theme that emerged was Deconstructivism, which was a development of postmodern architecture that began in the late 1980s. It is influenced by the theory of "Deconstruction", which is a form of semiotic analysis, and a reaction to structuralism and modernism. It was architectural movement or style that encouraged radical freedom of form and the open manifestation of complexity in a building rather than strict attention to functional concerns and conventional design elements. It is characterized by fragmentation, an interest in manipulating a structure's surface or skin, non- rectilinear shapes which appear to distort and dislocate elements of architecture, such as structure and envelope. The finished visual appearance of buildings that exhibit deconstructivist "styles" is characterized by unpredictability and controlled chaos. Renzo Piano (1937) Italian born Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano designs "High-Tech" buildings that showcase technological shapes and materials. Yet, in many of his works, he presents classical styling and a nod toward the past. 1977 Center Pompidou, Paris 1997 The Nemo Museum, Amsterdam 1998 Tijibauou Cultural Center, New Caldonia 2012 The Shard, London Frank Gehry (1929- ) Much of Gehry's work falls within the style of deconstructivism (often called post-structuralism) for its ability to go beyond current modalities of structural definition. In architecture, its application tends to depart from the earlier styles of the 20th century such as modernism or the international style, in its inherent criticism of culturally inherited givens such as societal goals and functional necessity. They deny the earlier modernist credo that "form follows function" 1996 The Dancing House, Prague 1997 Guggenheim, Bilbao, Spain 1996 Experience Music Project, Seattle Steven Holl Architect (1947- ) Born in Bremerton, Washington, Holl graduated from the Department of Architecture at the UW and studied in Rome in 1970 with the UW program, Architecture in Rome. He attended graduate school at the Architectural Assoiation School of Architecture in London in 1976 and practices in New York City, where he also taches at Columbia Univerity. Holl's architecture has undergone a shift in emphasis, from his earlier concern with typology to his current concern with a phenomenological approach; that is, with a concern for man's existentialist, bodily engagement with his surroundings. 1996 St. Ignatius Chapel, Seattle University Seattle 2002 Massachussetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Dorms, Simmons Hall Zaha Hadid (1950- ) A RCHITECTUR E 151: LECTURE OUTLINES W INTER 2013 Principal, Zaha Hadid Architects, London (Iraqi born) Pritzer Prize winner 2004 (only female to have won) Hadid's interest in architecture comes from the rigorous exercise of looking at the intersectin of architecture, landacpa ne geology as her practice integrades both natural topography and human- made systems. She experiemns with cutting edge technlogis, and these processes often resuots in undexpected and dynamic architectural forms Currently she is working in dozens of countries all over the world. Vitra Fire Station BMW Cultural Station Plan for Istanbul TERMS: hi- tech architecture High- tech architecture, also known as Late Modernism or Structural Expressionism, is an architectural style that emerged in the 1970s, incorporating elements of high- tech industry and technology into building design. deconstructivism: an architectural movement or style influenced by the breaking up of buildings that encourages radical freedom of form and the open manifestation of complexity in a building rather than strict attention to functional concerns and conventional design elements (as right angles or grids) structuralism: an anthropological movement that seeks to analyze social relationships in terms of highly abstract relational structures often expressed in a logical symbolism. semiotics: a general philosophical theory of signs and symbols that deals especially with their function in both artificially constructed and natural languages. ...
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