Rasta Language - e The Youth Black Faith were the first...

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I. Rasta Language (I-Man) a. Many Rastas abstain from eating meat and have a language that integrates specific Rasta elements into normal Jamaican speech. b. Rastas add new prefixes to words, create new words, and give different meanings to the existing lexicon. c. Rastas are sensitive to English words that might contain negative connotations. d. The little I refers to the lower state of man while the upper I refers to the immortal self. e. These language and dietary alterations widen the chasm between Rastafarians and other Africans and Europeans. f. Some Rastas won’t eat processed foods or alcohol. f.i. Food restrictions often give way to necessity. g. Lake found that Afrocentric identity meant higher likelihood of longer duration of breastfeeding. II. Hair and Headdress a. Europeans vilified African physiognomy. a.i. These views were internalized. b. Kinky hair is seen as bad while processed hair is seen as good. c. Lighter skin was valued over darker skin. d. Women are expected more than men to exhibit European modes of style.
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Unformatted text preview: e. The Youth Black Faith were the first Rastas to wear dreads in 1949. f. Rasta women are compelled to cover their hair or else they are shamed. III. Cross-Cultural Markers of Inferiority a. Veiling is not done to prevent sexual interest but as a shame of sexuality. b. Bodily control is an expression of social control. c. Prescriptions on women’s clothing are a stamp of inferiority. d. Rasta women’s dress is predicated on Bible interpretations. e. Rasta men, except for some Bobo Shanti, dress the same as other Jamaican men. f. Sometimes the modesty in clothing for Rasta women is a point of pride. IV. The Linguistic Containment of Women a. The language in many societies is fraught with aspects that relegate women to a second-class status. b. Many African languages have no word for woman, but instead they have only the he pronoun. c. The term most often used for women is daughter, relegating them to the status of children....
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