Slavery and Rastas

Slavery and Rastas - I Slavery and Rastas a Rastas grew out...

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I. Slavery and Rastas a. Rastas grew out of a complex of slavery and slave resistance in Jamaica. a.i. Beginning in the 16 th century, Jamaica became a major slave depot in the Caribbean. a.ii. Beginning in 1517 Africans were brought to Jamaica to work as household slaves for Spaniards. a.iii. The indigenous people of Jamaica, the Arawaks, were enslaved and wiped out by disease and inhuman labor conditions. b. The English took Jamaica from the Spanish in 1655 and established a planation economy run by African slaves. b.i. African slaves fueled the growth of European economies. Between 1700 and 1786 more than 600,000 Africans were transported from the west coast of Africa from the Igbo, Coromantee, Mandingo, Congo, Ashanti, and Akan peoples. b.ii. In most Caribbean islands, the number of female slaves outnumbered the males slightly. c. The 1844 census of Jamaica recorded 293,000 Africans, 15,000 Europeans, and 68,000 colored people. c.i. This economy completely depended on slave labor and English financial input. d. Sugar was the mainstay of the Jamaican economy at the beginning of the colonial period.
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d.i. It was used as a sweetener and to make rum. The cane stalk was used for construction. d.ii. By 1900, rum was produced on over 98% of the 140 Jamaican estates. d.iii. Rum prices increased and sugar prices decreased. During this period.
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