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FBS 8.pdf - MODULE 8 FLIGHT CATERING OPERATIONS AN D...

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MODULE 8FLIGHT CATERING OPERATIONS AN D ORGANIZATIONIntroductionThis chapter focuses on how food, beverages and equipment are prepared andassembled on a daily basis, prior to their transportation and loading onto the aircraft.There are three main elements to thisthe preparation of materials (hot and cold food,beverages, equipment), tray assembly, and flight assembly. The following explains howeach of these processes may be carried out, based on the typical practice across anumber of flight kitchens operated by many different companies. For any specificoperation, there will be local variations because of a number of factors, such as:the size of the operation• the complexity and/or sophistication of the flight service• the number of airlines handled by the facility• the number of flights serviced during the daythe duration of the flights servicedLearning OutcomesAt the end of each chapter, the students should be able to:Explain the complexity of production schedulingIdentify how meal production is managedUnderstand the tray assembly and flight assembly processUnderstand how flight production units are organized and staffedLearning ContentTopic 1Organization of production unit, and Production planning & schedulingTopic 2Meal production & packing, and Tray & trolley Assembly
ORGANIZATION OF PRODUCTION UNITBefore looking at production planning and operational activity, it is necessary tounderstand how a typical production unit might be organized. The traditional approachto this is to organize the unit so that under the unit general manager there would bemanagers responsible for different parts of the operation. Thus, there would beoperational managers in charge of food production (often called Executive Chef),purchasing and stores, equipment handling (concentrating on offloading and warewashing), and transportation. In addition there would be functional managersresponsible for human resources, accounting, and sales and marketing. This is shownin Figure below. The logic for this is that many organizations are organized in this waybased onwork disciplines’—so that managers can be trained and given expertise inthese areas. Furthermore, in the operations area, the physical plant is divided intoseparate areas, with specific staff assigned to work in those areas, so it is clear who hasthe responsibility for the area and for the staff. However, some firms are looking at theirorganization in new ways, often influenced by what is called business processreengineering (BPR). BPR advocates the concept that the organizational structureshould reflect the core processes undertaken by the business, with a manager givenresponsibility for each process. Under the traditional structure, if there is a problemwith servicing a flight, no one manager would be responsiblethe fault might lie withthe purchasing manager for not ordering supplies, the equipment manager for nothaving the right equipment, the production manager, or the transportation manager.

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Term
Fall
Professor
NoProfessor
Tags
Meal, Flight Production Unit

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