10/10 - 10/10 1. Schedules of Reinforcement a. See Graph b....

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10/10 1. Schedules of Reinforcement a. See Graph b. Definition i. Reinforcement is a process that increases the frequency of a targeted behavior by either using a negative stimulus or a positive stimulus. ii. Reinforcement is effective when it occurs on some schedule. iii. Psychologists have identified several different schedules by which reinforcement works well, including variable ratio, variable interval, fixed ratio, and fixed interval. 1. Each schedule provides reinforcement in different ways according to different criteria, and work better in different situations. 2. The goal is always the same--deliver reinforcement in a way that increases the chances of a target behavior occurring more frequently. c. Interval (time) i. Fixed Interval (FI) 1. An organism must wait (either not make the operant response, whatever it is in that experiment; or it can make the response but the response produces nothing) for a specific amount of time and then make the operant response in order to receive reinforcement ii. Variable Interval (VI) 1. Reinforcement is given to a response after specific
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course PSY 101 taught by Professor Savare during the Fall '07 term at SUNY Albany.

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10/10 - 10/10 1. Schedules of Reinforcement a. See Graph b....

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