4470Lecture_6Pt.2

4470Lecture_6Pt.2 - Paul Martin, General Dealer, London,...

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Paul Martin, General Dealer, London, 1893, gelatin dry plate Martin took pictures for a long series of informal, secretly observed scenes of London, which showed all the city’s manifold activities Yet, it was mostly the life of the lower classes that retained Martin’s attention: peddlers, workmen, beggars, and criminals
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Paul Martin, A Street Cab Accident in High Holborn: Overturned Cab, London, 1894, gelatin dry plate With smaller cameras, a new approach to the taking of pictures was possible: unposed, objective “documentary” photography
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Eadweard Muybridge, Galloping Horse, Motion Study – Sallie Gardner , owned by Leland Stanford, running at 1.40 gait over the Palo Alto track, June 19, 1878, Collotype Print In 1872, the builder of Central Pacific Railroad and former Governor of California, Leland Stanford, who was also a race-horse enthusiast, had made a bet on a popularly- debated question of the day: whether during a horse's trot, all four hooves were ever off the ground at the same time Hired Muybridge (see previous discussion of his work as landscape photographer) to settle the questions scientifically > beginning of a long and often tumultuous relationship between Muybridge and Stanford (Stanford U. named after him)
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To prove Stanford's claim, Muybridge developed a scheme for instantaneous motion picture capture >Muybridge's technology involved chemical formulas for photographic processing (collotype= a kind of photo-lithograph in which glass replaces stone as the printing surface) and an electrical trigger created to synchronize multiple cameras by the chief engineer for the Southern Pacific Railroad, John D. Isaacs (the trigger was Muybridge’s biggest problem, which he could only solve Isaacs’s help) In 1877, Muybridge settled Stanford's question with a single photographic negative showing Stanford's racehorse Occident airborne during trot (negative did not survived, although woodcuts made of it did)
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Théodore Géricault, Derby at Epsom , oil/c., 1820 By 1878, spurred on by Stanford to expand the experiment, Muybridge had successfully photographed a horse in fast motion using a series of twenty-four cameras > the cameras were arranged
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4470Lecture_6Pt.2 - Paul Martin, General Dealer, London,...

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