4470Lecture_9

4470Lecture_9 - Professor: Darius A. Spieth Art History...

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Professor: Darius A. Spieth Art History Program LSU School of Art
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Gertrude Käsebier, Portrait ( Miss N. ) , 1902, platinum print The Photo-Secession founded by Alfred Stieglitz proved to be a tremendously influential tool for the promotion of photography as an art form in America during the early 20 th century It grew out of the opening of “An Exhibition of American Photographs Arranged by the Photo-Secession” at the National Arts Club, New York, in 1902 The Photo-Secession was informal in nature and counted 12 founding member: John Bullock, William Dyer, Frank Eugene, Dallett Fuguet, Gertrude Käsebier, Joseph Keiley, Robert Redfield, Eva Watson-Schütze, Edward Steichen, Edmund Stirling, John Francis Strauss, and Clerence H. White Its mouthpiece became Camera Work , edited by Stiegliz; this image by Käsebier was reproduced in the first issue of Camera Work in 1903, devoted to her
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Sitter in this photograph was Evelyn Nesbitt, a sixteen-year-old showgirl and mistress of prominent architect Stanford White Nesbitt figured in a sensational early twentieth-century scandal and murder case (later fictionalized by E. L. Doctorow in the novel Ragtime (1975)) : She married railroad heir Harry K. Thaw, who, spurred by jealousy over her previous relationship with Standford White, shot him dead in 1906
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Gertrude Käsebier, A Christmas Scene , ca. 1904, platinum print Käsebier was probably the most successful American portrait photographer in the first half of the twentieth century Like Julia Margaret Cameron, Käsebier came to photography later in life, first as a hobbyist, then as an art photographer, and finally as a sought-after portraitist Her photographs of women sometimes relied on implied storytelling in the manner of Lady Hawarden
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Gertrude Käsebier, Blessed Art Thou Among Women , 1899, platinum print on Japanese tissue Blessed Art Thou Among Women shows a mother about to send her child into the world; portrait study of Agnes Rand Lee and her daughter Peggy The mother-and-child theme, prominent in Käsebier’s photography, was often depicted with the mother helping the child negotiate the passage in life, rather than holding the child close Religious overtones: a print of the Annunciation (Angel Gabriel appears to Virgin Mary) hangs on the wall behind the figures Agnes Lee is dressed in loose, flowing robes, as advocated by British promoter of the Arts and Crafts Movement, William Morris Shortly after photograph was taken, Peggy Lee died; Agnes posed again as sorrowful mother in Käsebier ‘s 1904 photograph The Heritage of Motherhood
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Gertrude Käsebier, Indian Chief , from Camera Notes Vol. 6 No. 1, 1902, photogravure Besides photographs of women, children, and motherhood, Käsebier took a whole series of pictures of native Americans She portrayed them in their tribal attire; the portraits underline the “noble” aspects of their character
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Clarence White, Drops of Rain , from Camera
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4470Lecture_9 - Professor: Darius A. Spieth Art History...

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