4470Lecture_7

4470Lecture_7 - Professor Darius A Spieth Art History Program LSU School of Art Thomas Eakins History of a Jump with annotations by Eadweard

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Unformatted text preview: Professor: Darius A. Spieth Art History Program LSU School of Art Thomas Eakins, History of a Jump, with annotations by Eadweard Muybridge, 1885, chronophotograph Whereas Marey contributed the scientific inspiration to Muybridge’s motion studies, Eakins provided the artistic side Muybridge met the realist painter Eakins in 1883 while lecturing in Philadelphia: Eakins used horse pictures as visual source material in his own paintings and incorporated the camera in his teachings It was also Eakins who suggested to Muybridge to include a measuring scale in the background of future photographs so artists could easily copy them Thomas Eakins, Walt Whitman , ca. 1887, platinum print Eakins embraced the potential of the camera as an aid to visual artists at a time when many painter understood photography more as a threat than as an opportunity Series of photographic shots in preparation of Eakins’s famous painting of the American poet Walt Whitman Thomas Eakins, Eakins at 39 , 1883, albumen print Despite of his deep interest in scientific problems, Eakins’s approach to photography was that of an artist (specifically, a painter) He preferred to give his subjects classical overtones; in this self- portrait as the classical god Pan, identifiable by his playing of reed pipes Thomas Eakins, Two Pupils in Greek Dress, besides Plaster Cast of Eakins’s ‘Arcadia,’ 1883, platinum print Thomas Eakins employed photography as a way to imbue his paintings with increased naturalism He used his students at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts as models and began to compile a photographic catalogue that would aid his studies of the human form This image is a study of pose and gesture in which the stance of the models consciously echoes that of the figures in Eakins' sculpted relief Arcadia (1883) seen resting on a worktable Thomas Eakins, Three Female Nudes, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts , ca. 1883, platinum print The same series includes a long suite of nude studies Depictions in the nude were seen as allusions to the time-honored ideal of classical nudity, which removed them in time and space, and hence made them socially acceptable Thomas Eakins, Instantaneous Photo of Students, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts , 1883, platinum print These nude studies often show remarkable aesthetic and iconographic similarities with Muybridge’s work (see example below of males boxing from the Complete Human and Animal Locomotion , 1887) Thomas Eakins, Thomas Eakins and Students, Swimming Nude, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts , ca. 1883, platinum print For Eakins, however, photography remained a means to an end: painting This can be observed by the comparison of a photograph with Eakins famous The Swimming Hole, 1885, oil o/canvas His teaching methods were controversial: there was no drawing from antique casts, and students received only a short study in charcoal, followed quickly by...
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course ART 4470 taught by Professor Dariusa.spieth during the Spring '08 term at LSU.

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4470Lecture_7 - Professor Darius A Spieth Art History Program LSU School of Art Thomas Eakins History of a Jump with annotations by Eadweard

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