3_15 - Racial and Ethnic Stratification Overview Poverty...

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Unformatted text preview: Racial and Ethnic Stratification Overview Poverty WrapUp Key Concepts Racial/Ethnic Composition of the U.S. Myths About Poverty in America Myth 6: Most of the poor live in the inner city Facts: Poverty isn't only an urban problem Most of the poor live outside the inner city Poverty rates are consistently higher in rural areas Perspectives on Poverty The Functionalist Perspective Poverty persists because it provides a positive function for society Provides pool of lowwage labor Creates jobs Labeling the poor as deviant helps to uphold values of thrift and hard work Guarantees hierarchy of unequal rewards Perspectives on Poverty The Conflict Perspective Poverty is the product of conflict between groups over wealth and power Capitalists benefit from having a pool of lowwage labor Poverty helps maintain "false consciousness" among the proletariat Race and Ethnicity: Key Concepts Racial groups: Groups that share a common genetic heritage and/or physical characteristics that are socially significant common geographic origin or distinctive cultural characteristics (i.e., language, religious faith, dress, and other customs) Ethnic groups: Groups that share a Race and Ethnicity: Key Concepts Social Construction of Race/Ethnicity Defined based in part on physical characteristics, but also on social factors (history, culture, economics, etc.) These categorizations have profound social significance Ex.) The "one drop rule" Race and Ethnicity: Key Concepts Social Construction of Race/Ethnicity Race/ethnicity are ascribed statuses Race/ethnicity are often master statuses Racial/ethnic status profoundly impacts life chances Reflect differences in group power and social inequality Race and Ethnicity: Key Concepts Minority groups: Group whose members are somehow distinct or separate from the dominant (majority) group Not necessarily a numerical question Question of the social significance of group membership and what that implies for stratification Definitions used by U.S. Census reflect social construction of race/ethnicity Racial/ethnic definitions used by Census have changed over time Race and Ethnicity in the United States "Mulatto" last appeared in 1920 "Hispanic" added in 1970 Option to claim multiracial heritage added in 2000 Race and Ethnicity in the United States 2000 White, nonHispanic 70% African American 12% Hispanic 13% Asian 4% Native American 1% Race and Ethnicity in the United States 2100 (projected) White, nonHispanic 40% African American 13% Hispanic 33% Asian 14% ...
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