Kimball Summer Assignment Jane Eyre Essay - By the end of Jane Eyre Jane has without a doubt reached self-actualization and developed to her full

Kimball Summer Assignment Jane Eyre Essay - By the end of...

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By the end of Jane Eyre, Jane has without a doubt reached self-actualization and developed to her full potential by becoming everything she was capable of being. Yet she only does so after finding a balance between both emotional dependence and autonomy, and between passion and principle. When she is finally able to follow both her heart and her mind, she is truly happy with herself and her place in the world.Indisputably, Jane requires acceptance and love from others to develop. Throughout the novel, she furthers her journey towards self-actualization wherever she discovers a sense of home. However until the last few chapters, this dependence on others for approval inhibits her from finding acceptance within herself. Jane Eyre begins with Jane as a young orphan living with her Aunt Reed and three cousins at Gateshead. Her lack of a parental substitute instigates her deep-rooted desire to be loved, a position her aunt fails to fill. In fact, Mrs. Reed’s harsh behavior establishes a feeling of estrangement within Jane, as well as the fear she will never find a sense of family. Jane experiences her first feeling of autonomy when she stands up to Mrs. Reed for locking her into the Red Room and cuts ties with her relatives as they do not meet her need for love. This action represents one of the various contradictions Jane encompasses. While she asserts her independence numerous times throughout the novel, she repeatedly searches for acceptance from those around her, and does both even when they impede on her emotional wellbeing. Her duration at Lowood School exemplifies this. When Mr. Brocklehurst publicly reprimands her about her

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