LIN 200 Week 3 day 2 - AAVE

Is bill cosby right how people choose to talk in

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Unformatted text preview: decreoliza>on AAVE AAE Origins: The Anglicist view African Languages Earlier English Pidgin Creole Other Non ­ Standard Englishes Modern Standard English African American English Gullah (Sea Islands) Jamaican Patois AAE Origins: The Creolist view African Languages Earlier English Pidgin Creole Other Non ­ Standard Englishes Modern Standard English African American English Gullah (Sea Islands) Jamaican Patois Parallels btwn AAVE and creoles Copula Absence in AAE (young ingroup) and Jamaican Creole 100 % Copula Absence 90 80 70 60 AAE 50 40 Jamaican Creole 30 20 10 0 Noun Locative Adjective -ing Verb Following Grammatical Environment gon' AAVE Origins: a unified view •  Proponents of the unified theory state that African ­ American English arose from a number of sources, including West African languages and Southern States English, through a variety of evolu>onary tracks. AAE Origins: a unified view African Languages Earlier English Pidgin Creole Other Non ­ Standard Englishes Modern Standard English African American English Gullah (Sea Islands) Jamaican Patois Abtudes towards AAVE This will sound racist no maNer how I write it, so here goes...Some>mes stereotypes are true… "Ebonics" is associated with black people because that form of slang is supposedly based on speech paNerns that developed over the years. Where did it originally come from? From slaves who were never taught to speak pro...
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