Comm paper 1 - Announcer Stereotypes 1 Running Head:...

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Announcer Stereotypes 1 Running Head: Announcer Stereotypes Biased Voices of Sports: Racial and Gender Stereotyping in College Basketball Announcing Anthony J. Pugliese Comm. 224 Communication Research October 20, 2006
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Announcer Stereotypes 2 Growing up many children become consumed with playing and watching sports. Most athletes start playing so young that many can not remember a time when they had not been participating in one type of sport or another. Therefore, it may be safe to say that sports and sports announcers can have a large impact on our children and youth’s lives. One of the best known announcers is Dick Vitale who often announces the big, largely viewed, and publicized games. Dick Vitale says things like calling players "PTPer" or prime-time players ( http://espn.go.com/dickvitale/vfile/index.html ). When Dick Vitale says these things some claim that some of his comments are aimed or usually stereotyped for players of a certain gender or race. Many of these stereotypes are gender and racial stereotypes that extend way beyond basketball or even athletics, many of these are strong stereotypes that consume our society today. Dick Vitale is not the only announcer that does this however, when listening to a college basketball game many announcers often label white male players has hard working with a great understanding of the game or labeling black male players as naturally athletic and quick. So do these phrases, these so called observations by announcers create or promote racial and gender stereotyping? Furthermore, when people hear these things do they not care, or do they not know? Regardless, is it possible that the announcers do it unconsciously? Many college basketball fans, become excited and curious in hearing what the announcers have to say, and announcers are incredibly useful in making the game make sense to those who do not have a good understanding of the game. Also, these announcers are usually considered knowledgeable experts, which also contributes to making people think that everything they say must be
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Announcer Stereotypes 3 correct. Throughout this article we will go through the study and findings of the study, “Biased voices in sports; Gender and racial stereotyping in college basketball announcing.” The object of the study was to find out whether the traditional racial and gender stereotypes of sports announcers continued in spite of more Black and female Before the actual study could be started Billings and Eastman had to figure out what the goal of this study was, and what they thought this study would show. First like stated Billings and Eastman were interested in finding out whether racial and gender stereotypes continued even with more black and female announcer. Billings and Eastman (2001) then constructed six Hypothesis, which were: 1. Hypothesis 1 : Collectively, men’s basketball games will receive significantly more attention in descriptive commentary than women’s games. 2. Hypothesis 2
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course COMM theory taught by Professor ? during the Spring '08 term at West Chester.

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Comm paper 1 - Announcer Stereotypes 1 Running Head:...

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