3.06 War at Home.doc - 03.06 Chart African Americans German...

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03.06 Chart How was this group treated by the U.S government during World War I? How was this group treated by other Americans during World War I? How did the group react to the way they were treated? How did World War I change the way of life for this group in the United States? African Americans Blacks were able to serve in all branches of the Army except for the aviation units. The government made no provision for military training of black officers and soon created segregated training camps for that purpose. The service of African- Americans in the military had dramatic implications for African- Americans. Black soldiers faced systemic racial discrimination in the army and endured virulent hostility upon returning to their homes at the end of the war. At the same time, service in the army empowered soldiers to demand their individual rights as American citizens and laid the groundwork for the future movement for racial justice Excited for a change only to meet the same fate after the war This war introduced the most amount of African American help in the war, some racist ideology was starting to change . German Americans During World War I, U.S. Government Propaganda Erased German Culture As the U.S. entered World War I, German culture was erased as the government promoted the unpopular war through anti-German propaganda. This backlash culminated in the lynching of a German immigrant States banned German- language schools and removed German books from libraries. Some German Americans were interned, and one German American man, who was also targeted for being socialist, was killed by a mob. Secondly, in response to this, German Americans began intentionally “assimilating” to avoid becoming targets. They were saddened, but most could understand the other side’s point of view . Their culture and propaganda was erased Jewish Americans Approximately 225,000 Jewish Americans served in World War I. An estimated one-third of them were foreign born. During the War, Congress passed legislation allowing for the expedited naturalization of foreign-born members June 28 will mark the centennial of the spark that ignited that war: the assassination of the Austrian archduke, Franz Ferdinand. Jewa opposed the war on socialist principle. In that, he resembled most American Jews, who, like the majority of neutral Nothing really changed, they were adapting into American society
of the military. But like other minorities, Jewish Americans have also faced prejudice, especially during periods of economic hardship or war. During World War I and the

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