Pitot Tube

Pitot Tube - John Luff Pitot Tube A Pitot tube is an...

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John Luff Pitot Tube A Pitot tube is an instrument engineered to measure fluid flow. It consists of two coaxial tubes: an interior tube that runs perpendicular to the flow of the fluid, and an exterior tube that runs parallel to the flow. The interior tube measures stagnation pressure, which is static pressure plus dynamic pressure (The pressure created by the fluid being forced into the tube), while the exterior tube that runs parallel to the flow will register just the static pressure. Then the difference in pressures registered by both the exterior and interior tubes will be measured using an instrument known as a manometer. A manometer is a ‘U’ shaped device that applies Bernoulli’s equation in order to find the difference in liquid levels on either side of the ‘U’ shaped tube, which in turn will also find the difference in pressures because, the liquid levels are directly proportional to the amount of pressure on both sides of the tube. By finding the difference in pressure of the two
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Pitot Tube - John Luff Pitot Tube A Pitot tube is an...

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