HLST 2010 Paper 1.pdf - Short Paper 1 HH/HLST 2010 Samrah...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 5 pages.

Short Paper 1 HH/HLST 2010 October 27, 2020 Samrah Zaidi 217026683 Dennis Raphael
Zaidi 1 Income, race, and immigrant status all affect COVID-19 cases as they determine a person’s risk of exposure to the virus and access to medical care. Social determinants, such as the ones listed above, have a direct correlation with COVID-19 cases, and governments can use these determinants to find a solution for this pandemic. Income is a huge factor when it comes to COVID-19 cases, for instance low-income earners are more likely to be infected than people with a high income. Many low-income employees will not be considered for the Canadian Emergency Response Benefit if they work from home or leave their jobs; hence they are under pressure to continue working in jobs that compromise their wellbeing. Social determinants contribute to how vulnerable one might be to being infected with COVID-19 (Amin & Bond, 2020), so when low-income earners expose themselves to the outside world everyday, they increase their risk of being infected. High income earners also have job security and are able to work from home, therefore they are not as exposed to the virus. Studies show that only 6% of those with an income of $150,000 or more are infected with the virus, whereas those making $0-$29,999 are infected at a much higher rate of 27% (City of Toronto, 2020). Additionally, full-time workers get benefits that part-time or contract workers do not receive which also impacts their ability to recover from the COVID-19 virus. Race is another key factor that contributes to the COVID-19 cases as it reduces the access to employment, housing and education. A lack of employment can lead to under-lying health issues like heart disease that increase the chances of a COVID-19 infection. Few racialized populations have been shown to be over-represented in places with higher cases of COVID-19, including Black, South Asian, South East Asian, and Latin American (Toronto Public Health, 2020). The reason cases are so much higher among these racialized groups is because they are not given the same employment opportunities, or access to healthcare as other Canadians. The racialized community makes up 83% of the cases in Toronto (Amin & Bond, 2020), which goes to show the lack of concern for these minorities. The immigrant status relates to the COVID-19 cases through a variety of factors like living conditions, income, and access to medical care.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture