Stitz-Zeager_College_Algebra_e-book

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Unformatted text preview: ) = x2 − 36 + 1.6 Function Arithmetic 4. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) 2 −3 0 6x + 3h − 1 −2x − h + 2 3x2 + 3xh + h2 2 (g) − x(x + h) 63 3 (1 − x − h)(1 − x) −9 (i) (x − 9)(x + h − 9) 1 (j) √ √ x+h+ x (k) m (h) (l) 2ax + ah + b 64 1.7 Relations and Functions Graphs of Functions In Section 1.4 we defined a function as a special type of relation; one in which each x-coordinate was matched with only one y -coordinate. We spent most of our time in that section looking at functions graphically because they were, after all, just sets of points in the plane. Then in Section 1.5 we described a function as a process and defined the notation necessary to work with functions algebraically. So now it’s time to look at functions graphically again, only this time we’ll do so with the notation defined in Section 1.5. We start with what should not be a surprising connection. The Fundamental Graphing Principle for Functions The graph of a function f is the set of points whic...
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