Stitz-Zeager_College_Algebra_e-book

22 13 1 31 hence 2 1 is not on the graph of x2

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Unformatted text preview: .2 Relations 21 (e) (g) y y 4 4 3 3 2 2 1 1 −3 −2 −1 (f) 1 2 3 x −1 1 2 (h) y x 3 y 3 7 2 6 1 5 −1 1 2 4 x 3 3 −2 2 −3 1 −3 −2 −1 x 1 3. (a) A = {(−4, −1), (−3, 0), (−2, 1), (−1, 2), (0, 3), (1, 4)} (b) B = {(x, y ) : x > −2} (c) C = {(x, y ) : y ≥ 0} (d) D = {(x, y ) : −3 < x ≤ 2} (e) E = {(x, y ) : x ≥ 0,y ≥ 0} (f) F = {(x, y ) : −4 < x < 5, −3 < y < 2} 4. (a) (b) y y 3 2 1 −3 −2 −1 3 2 1 x The line x = −2 −3 −2 −1 x The line y = 3 5. The line x = 0 is the y -axis and the line y = 0 is the x-axis. 22 1.3 Relations and Functions Graphs of Equations In the previous section, we said that one could describe relations algebraically using equations. In this section, we begin to explore this topic in greater detail. The main idea of this section is The Fundamental Graphing Principle The graph of an equation is the set of points which satisfy the equation. That is, a point (x, y ) is on the graph of an equation if and only if x and y satisfy the equation. Example 1.3.1. Determine if (2, −1) is on t...
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This note was uploaded on 05/03/2013 for the course MATH Algebra taught by Professor Wong during the Fall '13 term at Chicago Academy High School.

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