Stitz-Zeager_College_Algebra_e-book

Depending on the situation one method may be easier

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Unformatted text preview: 0), (−1 − √ 2 2 2 ,− 2 √ √ xy , 22 3, 0) √ 2 2 2, 2 ,− 8. (−3, −4), 5 miles, (4, −4) 11. (a) The distance from A to B is √ C is 65. Since √ 13, the distance from A to C is √ 13 2 + √ 52 2 = √ 65 2 √ 52, and the distance from B to , we are guaranteed by the converse of the Pythagorean Theorem that the triangle is right. 14 Relations and Functions 1.2 Relations We now turn our attention to sets of points in the plane. Definition 1.2. A relation is a set of points in the plane. Throughout this text we will see many different ways to describe relations. In this section we will focus our attention on describing relations graphically, by means of the list (or roster) method and algebraically. Depending on the situation, one method may be easier or more convenient to use than another. Consider the set of points below y 4 3 (4, 3) 2 (−2, 1) 1 −4 −3 −2 −1 1 2 3 4 x −1 −2 −3 (0, −3) −4 These three points constitute a relation. Let us call this relation R. Above, we have a graphical description of R. A...
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This note was uploaded on 05/03/2013 for the course MATH Algebra taught by Professor Wong during the Fall '13 term at Chicago Academy High School.

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