Stitz-Zeager_College_Algebra_e-book

Factoring gives us x 3x 1 0 so that x 3 or x 1

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Unformatted text preview: f the functions g , h, and i in Example 2.2.1 starting with the graph of f (x) = |x| and applying transformations as in Section 1.8. For example, the for the function g , we have g (x) = |x − 3| = f (x − 3). Theorem 1.3 tells us this causes the graph of f to be shifted to the right 3 units. Choosing three representative points on the graph of f , (−1, 1), (0, 0) and (1, 1), we can graph g as follows. y y 4 −3 −2 −1 3 2 (−1, 1) 4 3 2 (1, 1) 1 (0, 0) 1 2 f (x) = |x| 1 3 4 5 x shift right 3 unit −− − − − −→ −−−−−− add 3 to each x-coordinate −3 −2 −1 (2, 1) 1 (4, 1) 2 (3, 0) 4 5 x g (x) = f (x − 3) = |x − 3| Similarly, the graph of h in Example 2.2.1 can be understood via Theorem 1.2 as a vertical shift down 3 units. The function i can be graphed using Theorem 1.7 by finding the final destinations of the three points (−1, 1), (0, 0) and (1, 1) and connecting them in the characteristic ‘∨’ fashion. While the methods in Section 1.8 can be used to graph an entire family of absolute value functions, not all functions involving absolute values posses the characteristic ‘∨’ shape, as the next example...
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This note was uploaded on 05/03/2013 for the course MATH Algebra taught by Professor Wong during the Fall '13 term at Chicago Academy High School.

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