Stitz-Zeager_College_Algebra_e-book

Find the exact polar coordinates of the points of

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Unformatted text preview: b = 16.75 (g) α = 68.7◦ , a = 88, b = 92 (q) γ = 74.6◦ , c = 3, a = 3.05 (h) α = 68.7◦ , a = 70, b = 90 (r) β = 29.13◦ , γ = 83.95◦ , b = 314.15 (i) α = 30◦ , a = 7, b = 14 (s) γ = 120◦ , β = 61◦ , c = 4 (j) α = 42◦ , a = 17, b = 23.5 (t) α = 50◦ , a = 25, b = 12.5 2. (Another Classic Story Problem: Bearings) In this series of exercises we introduce and work with the navigation tool known as bearings. Simply put, a bearing is the direction you are heading according to a compass. The classic nomenclature for bearings, however, is not given as an angle in standard position, so we must first understand the notation. A bearing is given as an acute angle of rotation (to the east or to the west) away from the north-south (up and down) line of a compass rose. For example, N40◦ E (read “40 east of north”) is a bearing which is rotated clockwise 40◦ from due north. If we imagine standing at the origin in the Cartesian Plane, this bearing would have us heading...
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This note was uploaded on 05/03/2013 for the course MATH Algebra taught by Professor Wong during the Fall '13 term at Chicago Academy High School.

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