Stitz-Zeager_College_Algebra_e-book

Here more than ever we need to rely on the geometry

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Unformatted text preview: rs should thank us for this. Don’t worry! Radians will be back before you know it! 11.2 The Law of Sines 763 B β h a c Q γ α α A C b The remaining case is when ABC is a right triangle. In this case, the Law of Sines reduces to the formulas given in Theorem 10.4 and is left to the reader. In order to use the Law of Sines to solve a triangle, we need at least one angle-side opposite pair. The next example showcases some of the power, and the pitfalls, of the Law of Sines. Example 11.2.2. Solve the following triangles. Give exact answers and decimal approximations (rounded to hundredths) and sketch the triangle. 1. α = 120◦ , a = 7 units, β = 45◦ 4. α = 30◦ , a = 2 units, c = 4 units 2. α = 85◦ , β = 30◦ , c = 5.25 units 5. α = 30◦ , a = 3 units, c = 4 units 3. α = 30◦ , a = 1 units, c = 4 units 6. α = 30◦ , a = 4 units, c = 4 units Solution. 1. Knowing an angle-side opposite pair, namely α and a, we may proceed in using the Law of √ ◦ ◦ ◦) Sines. Since β = 45◦ , we get sin(45 ) = sin(120 ) or b = 7...
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This note was uploaded on 05/03/2013 for the course MATH Algebra taught by Professor Wong during the Fall '13 term at Chicago Academy High School.

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