Stitz-Zeager_College_Algebra_e-book

Lastly note that the number of positive or negative

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Unformatted text preview: 2 0 3.2 The Factor Theorem and The Remainder Theorem 203 1 From the first division, we get 4x4 − 4x3 − 11x2 + 12x − 3 = x − 2 4x3 − 2x2 − 12x + 6 . The 3 − 2x2 − 12x + 6 = x − 1 2 − 12 . Combining these results, we 4x second division tells us 4x 2 4 − 4x3 − 11x2 + 12x − 3 = x − 1 2 4x2 − 12 . To find the remaining zeros of p, we set have 4x 2 √ 4x2 − 12 = 0 and get x = ± 3. A couple of things about the last example are worth mentioning. First, the extension of the synthetic division tableau for repeated divisions will be a common site in the sections to come. Typically, we will start with a higher order polynomial and peel off one zero at a time until we are left with a quadratic, whose roots can always be found using the Quadratic Formula. Secondly, we √ √ √ found x = ± 3 are zeros of p. The Factor Theorem guarantees x − 3 and x − − 3 are both factors of p. We can certainly put the Factor Theorem to the test and continue the synthetic division tableau from above t...
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