Stitz-Zeager_College_Algebra_e-book

The following result characterizes when two sets of

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Unformatted text preview: ccos(−0.5637) ≈ 2.1697 x = 2π − arccos(−0.5637) ≈ 4.1135 (e) x = arctan(117) ≈ 1.5622 x = π + arctan(117) ≈ 4.7038 746 Foundations of Trigonometry (f) x = π + arctan(−0.6109) ≈ 2.5932 x = 2π + arctan(−0.6109) ≈ 5.7348 √ −1 + 5 ≈ 0.6662 (g) x = arcsin 2 x = π − arcsin (h) No solution ∞ 7. (a) (2kπ, (2k + 2)π ) k=−∞ ∞ (b) k=−∞ ∞ (c) k=−∞ ∞ (d) k=−∞ ∞ (e) k=−∞ (4k − 1)π (4k + 3)π , 2 2 (4k + 1)π (2k + 1)π , 4 2 ∪ (2k + 1)π (4k + 3)π , 2 4 (6k − 1)π (6k + 1)π , ∪ 3 3 (4k + 1)π (4k + 3)π , 2 2 k π (k + 1)π , 2 2 (f) (−∞, ∞) ∞ (g) k=−∞ k π (k + 1)π , 2 2 −1 + 2 √ 5 ≈ 2.4754 Chapter 11 Applications of Trigonometry 11.1 Applications of Sinusoids In the same way exponential functions can be used to model a wide variety of phenomena in nature,1 the cosine and sine functions can be used to model their fair share of natural behaviors. In section 10.5, we introduced the concept of a sinusoid as a function which can be writte...
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This note was uploaded on 05/03/2013 for the course MATH Algebra taught by Professor Wong during the Fall '13 term at Chicago Academy High School.

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