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1 Practicum: Decision Tree Student’s Name: Institution Affiliation:
2 Practicum: Decision Tree Mental disorders can create complications in individuals’ life, leading to unhappiness and relationship conflicts. Children who suffer from mental illness tend to lose concentration and perform poorly in school. Caring for children with mental illness tends to cause health problems, as well as reduced quality of life for family members. Thus, the PMHNPs should ensure that family members are able to identify mental disorders in children, in addition to collaborating with them on decisions taken to improve the health of such children. Case Summary and Treatment Plan This study focuses on an 8-year-old Caucasian female client, who was brought to the clinic by her parents with the suspicion that their child could be having attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD). After prescribing the medication, the client was brought back because she was not responding to the medications. The Conners’ Teacher Rating Scale revealed that the client was inattentive, easily distracted, and with a short attention span. The client does not concentrate in class but is fine when at home. She appeared appropriately developed with respect to her age and was appropriately oriented in all four spheres. As a PMHNP, I had to make three vital decisions on how to address the client’s problem. Decision #1: Differential Diagnosis After evaluating a number of diagnoses using differential diagnosis, I concluded that the young client had Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD), predominantly inattentive presentation, which is manifested through inattention, and accompanied by careless mistakes in schoolwork, failure to follow instructions, being absent-minded, reluctance to undertake
3 activities requiring sustained mental effort, and forgetfulness of daily activities (de la Pena et al., 2020). The choice of a specific learning disorder with impairment in reading, as well as impairment in mathematics, was not appropriate, as the client was not performing well in several subjects, but not specifically in mathematics. The client was also not having autism spectrum disorder (ASD) that was mild and co-occurring with a social anxiety disorder (SAD), where the

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