MD1Examining Literacy Instruction Instructional Hierarchy BarberN.doc

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1 Examining Literacy Instruction Instructional Hierarchy Nancy Barber Master of Science in Education, Walden University EDUC 6795: Implementing Literacy -Based Instructional Interventions Suzanne O’Neill November 8, 2020
2 Abstract Educators who teach language education to students tend to focus on their ability to read and write. The student’s behavior towards reading has a significant part in the student’s willingness to read and comprehend. Students with exceptionalities display different actions that can influence their ability to read and understand what they read. Evidence-based intensive interventions delivered with fidelity provide explicit student feedback in reading instructions students’ understanding via oral and written responses on worksheets (Ciullo et al.,2016.) Examining Literacy Instruction: Instructional Hierarchy According to the Cobb County School District(2015), the Balanced Literacy Instructional framework states that the foundation of language or word study is embedded and ongoing in balanced literacy instructions. Students learn in diiffernt ways, which poses a challenge for educators to implement different strategies to ensure they are making progress towards mastering the intended goal(s). Literacy-based interventions target the student’s performance and focus on procedures and instructions necessary to improve direct teacher instructions while addressing their unique learning style (Daly et al.,2015). The paper will analyze the reading progressions while utilizing the four tiers in the instructional hierarchy, literacy interventions that are evidence-based practices, and strategies that the teacher implements that support the student during each tier and challenges that the student experience. Tier 1 The students in this paper will be referred to as Sue. Sue is a second-grade student who reads below grade level has reading and writing goals and objectives detailed in her IEP to address these deficits. Tier 1 of the instructional hierarchy is the “acquisition” stage as students learn phonological awareness, letter-sound, and accurate word reading (Daly et al. 2015). In
3 identifying Sue’s strengths and weaknesses, I utilized grade-level phonics, reading comprehension passage to assess her comprehension and fluency level. Sue matched the correct vowel sound with the picture card. Sue also wrote the correct beginning and ending the constant sound of the word. The last strategy used during this tier was fluency in having Sue read a

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