3. Development-Microbiology

3. Development-Microbiology - MBI 111 - Microorganisms and...

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    MBI 111 - Microorganisms and Human Disease 3. Development of Microbiology as a Science
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    Development of Microbiology as a Science Beginnings of Microbiology Early Microscopists Robert Hooke , England - 1665 he did not invent microscope - he made it widely known ( Zacharias Jannsen , Netherlands, first compound scope) published Micrographie - contained thoughts on: chemistry description of microscope various illustrations illustrated many small objects and creatures description of a slice of cork as compartmentalized into cells led to the use of name “cell” as in cell biology
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    Beginnings of Microbiology Early Microscopists Antonie van Leeuwenhoek , Netherlands - 1670s a man of importance draper, haberdasher, head of City Council, inspector of weights and measures, and court surveyor made microscopes in his spare time first to inspect cloth later hair, blood, feces, sperm cells (he speculated that they contained tiny embryos)
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    Beginnings of Microbiology Early Microscopists he sent letters to the Royal Society of London the only scientific group of the period over 500 letters in a fifty year period 1674 - observed cloudy water from a marsh with his lens observed “animacules” - microorganisms soon found “animacules” from other sources rainwater, material from his teeth, feces, etc. 1676 - letter to the Royal Society contains first detailed description of microorganisms described protozoa Paramecium , amoeba, fungi, microscopic algae, bacteria in various shapes (rods, spheres, spirals)
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    Beginnings of Microbiology Early Microscopists became famous in his time Peter the Great and Queen Elizabeth came to peer through his microscopes after his death, interest in microbiology waned he kept his technique for making lenses secret scientist saw microorganisms as “idle curiosities of nature” disease was shrouded in magic and mysticism no one thought microorganisms could cause disease in humans
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    Beginnings of Microbiology Development of the Germ Theory of Disease Development of the Germ Theory of Disease Where does disease come from? spontaneous generation theological implications pre-existing factors omne vivum ex ovo pre-existing conditions - something in the air Why is this important? If pre-existing, then potential for control and influence of events
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    Beginnings of Microbiology Development of the Germ Theory of Disease Pre-existing factors 400 BC - physicians thought tiny animals caused diseases ideas were dismissed when they couldn't eliminate “plagues” 1530 - Fracostoro proposed the idea of invisible particles causing disease, (his ideas were not taken seriously) “Contagion is an infection that passes from one thing to another” by contact, lifeless objects, and air 1646 - Kircher saw “microscopic worms” in blood of plague victims 1700s - miasmatic theory of disease
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3. Development-Microbiology - MBI 111 - Microorganisms and...

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