nomenclature

nomenclature - CHEMICAL NOMENCLATURE The lingo of naming...

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Unformatted text preview: CHEMICAL NOMENCLATURE The lingo of naming chemical compounds p o t a s s i u m p e r c h l o r a t e h y p o c h l o r o u s a c i d N H 4 N O 3 MgCl 2 d i p h o s p h o r u s p e n t o x i d e c o p p e r ( I I ) c h l o r i d e H g 2 B r 2 FeCl 3 s o d i u m h y p o c h l o r i t e , N a C l O K M n O 4 magnesium sulfate Two chief classifications of chemical compounds: Organic : composed mainly of carbon (C), hydrogen (H), and oxygen (O).will not consider at this time. Inorganic : all other compounds; i. e., the rest of the Periodic Table.will focus on these now. Our first exercise with naming chemical compounds will deal with two-element inorganic compounds containing a metal and a nonmetal... Metals are positively- charged CATIONS, nonmetals are negatively- charged ANIONS!! Inorganic Binary Compounds Compounds containing a metal and a nonmetal Compounds containing two nonmetals (Type III) Metals with ions of only one charge (Type I) Metals with ions of more than one charge (Type II) RULES FOR NAMING TYPE I BINARY IONIC COMPOUNDS 1. The cation is always named FIRST, the anion SECOND. 2. The simple cation takes the name of its parent element. 3. The simple anion is named by taking the first part of its element name (root), dropping the ending, and adding -ide . Refer to Chang, Section 2.7, Naming Compounds, Ionic Compounds , pp. 53-56, and all tables, figures, and examples given within, for examples of naming Type I compounds. Hydride H- Hydrogen H + Cesium Cs + Rubidium Rb + Barium Ba 2+ Strontium Sr 2+ Potassium K + Calcium Ca 2+ Lithium Li + Beryllium Be 2+ Sodium Na + Magnesium Mg 2+ Aluminum Al 3+ Carbide C 4- Phosphide P 3- Nitride N 3- Telluride Te 2- Selenide Se 2- Sulfide S 2- Oxide O 2- Iodide I- Bromide Br- Chloride Cl- Fluoride F- MONOATOMIC IONS (Based on Table 2.2, p. 55, Chang text) CATIONS ANIONS Hydrogen can be both a cation and an anion. and now a few examples of naming Type I binary compounds. KI Cation takes name of its parent element. potassium Anion takes root name of its element, drops ending, and adds -ide. iodine ide and now a few examples of naming Type I binary compounds. Na 2 O Cation takes name of its parent element. sodium Anion takes root name of its element, drops ending, and adds -ide. oxygen ide and now a few examples of naming Type I binary compounds. Ca 3 P 2 Cation takes name of its parent element. calcium Anion takes root name of its element, drops ending, and adds -ide....
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nomenclature - CHEMICAL NOMENCLATURE The lingo of naming...

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