Notes on Lear

Notes on Lear - Jonathan Lear, Aristotle: The Desire to...

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Jonathan Lear, Aristotle: The Desire to Understand. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988.) I. The Desire to Understand Aristotle’s basic point in the opening lines of the Metaphysics is that we have a basic desire for knowledge, a desire that finds its expression in our delight in gazing upon signs, reading, writing, discussing, etc. Aristotle sees the satisfaction of the desire in the case of sight-seeing as telling: clearly we delegat, i.e., are satisfied, by the mere seeing. Yet this delight would be inexplicable were our basic desire something like self-aggrandizement. Leisure is the pre-condition for man’s full pursuit of intellectual activity, as is clear in the history of mathematics; only in Egypt, where men had leisure, was mathematics developed into a theoretical science and pursued as such. From sensation and its activities originate memories, and from memories, experience. Repeated perception of the same thing, thanks to experience, results in awareness of
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course HSPH 101 taught by Professor Noone during the Fall '07 term at Catholic.

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Notes on Lear - Jonathan Lear, Aristotle: The Desire to...

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