Lecture 4 (Sept 5)

Lecture 4 (Sept 5) - Biological Sciences 110A Introduction...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lecture 4: Protein Structure, Folding & Function  Primary amino acid sequence  Secondary protein structure:  α -helix and  β -sheet  Domain and subunit structure of proteins  Higher order protein structure  Protein binding specificity  Modification of proteins after synthesis  Techniques to purify proteins and analyze structure Biological Sciences 110A: Introduction to Biology Kendal Broadie Reading in Chapter 2 (54-64) Karp
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Proteins are made by joining amino acids via “Peptide bonds” Peptide bonds are formed by removing water (H 2 O):  “dehydration reaction” Polypeptides have “Amino- (N-)” and “Carboxy- (C-) termini” Single bonds of  α -carbons rotate (constrained by steric hindrance of side chains) Flexibility of backbone allows polypeptides to fold into higher order structures The unique sequence of amino acid side chains (R = residue) provide the protein its functional  characteristics: 1) charged, 2) polar and 3) non-polar. 
Background image of page 2
Proteins have multiple levels of structural organization Primary (I o ):  The linear sequence of amino acids Covalent (peptide) bonds between amino acids Note : In addition to the core 20 amino acids, a number of other amino acids are also found in  proteins. These residues arise by alteration of the side chains of the basic 20 amino acids after their  incorporation into the polypeptide chain (discussed later in course). With 20 amino acids, the  number of different proteins  that can be formed is 20 n   (n=# aa’s). Since most  proteins are >100 residues,  the variety is essentially  unlimited.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Proteins have multiple levels of structural organization Primary (I o ):  The linear sequence of amino acids Covalent (peptide) bonds between amino acids Secondary (II o ):  Folding into local, higher order structures H-bonds between backbone peptide bond (H and O) α -helix β -sheet + NH 3 -MGD… …K 2066 - COO - Conformation : The 3D arrangement of  atoms in a molecule (spatial organization)
Background image of page 4
C α N O H R The α -helix is a common II o  structure in proteins R 1 R 2 R 3 R 7 R 4 R R 9 R 8 α 1 α 2 α 3 α 4 α 7 α 8 α 9 α -Helices are stabilized by  H-bonds  between N-H of  one peptide bond with the C=O of another four amino  acids  along the polypeptide backbone
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 25

Lecture 4 (Sept 5) - Biological Sciences 110A Introduction...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online