VIS126 Final Note Summary

VIS126 Final Note Summary - Northern Athapaskan Art...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Northern Athapaskan Art Northern Athapaskan Art (Pine to NW Canada) part of sub-arctic: similar cultures along the coast Made use of applique decoration sewn or woven on hide or fabric-like “wool-wersted braid,” rickrack, silk, ribbon, cloth, braids, quills etc. Porcupine quillwork embroidery sewn or woven Babiche-rawhide netting all-purpose hunting bag used mainly for storing gear Some European materials already present in Athapaskan art wool yarn, red/pink silk yarn Porcupine quill embroidery usually in the form of a geometric strip created on a loom Used sewing techniques: warp sinew (muscle to bone connector) and weft porcupine Process of quill preparation: Soften quills via soaking in mouth, pull out through front teeth to flatten out Naturally white or cream colored can dye to other colors Curving, organic floral design rare with porcupine quill embroidery brittle 19 th century clothing utilized quillwork along hems, borders; emphasis of decoration on shoulders Natural, indigenous style fringe, red ocher pigment Everyday use porcupine After introduction of beads (esp. seed beads) elaborate, festive, floral designs woven on looms Novel material, came in a wide variety of colors, metallic, and faceted new design possibilities native women went crazy for them bought in strings
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Beads primarily available by about 1700 in Eastern parts of Canada and somewhat later in W. Canada Introduced in East by Europeans and French and in the West by Russians (larger beads: necklace/pony) Glass beads introduced by fur trade and originally made in glass-working areas like Venice and Czechoslovakia Pre-history beads also present (but not glass) stone, seeds, shell pierced with a hole limited colors Kate Duncan interview “represented memory of flowers in summer months” not characteristic of real-life flowers ”fantasy flowers” Land of midnight sun: long winters 24-hours of daylight in summer: high temperatures blooming of nature Plants considered as friends/allies of humans Animals antagonistic Beading stemmed from silk-floss embroidery Origins of artwork thought to be French Ursuline nuns taught silk floss embroidery to Huron girls and spread from Huron area to West and North More influential thought to be: 1844 Grey Nuns teaching women to use floral styles of embroidery with both beads and silk floss Women taught by nuns (from aristocracy) objectives of missions to introduce North America to European way of life/values assimilation and to be “good wives/mothers/ladies” in European society Socialization (to become gentile) religious devotional duties; decoration for churches and clothing for clergy Beadwork associated with both French renaissance and lower-class peasant folk-art
Background image of page 2
Before introduction of beads, not very many examples of floral designs French tradition popular in Rococo period (marked by ornate style: flowers, etc. densely
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course VIS 126 taught by Professor Newsome during the Winter '07 term at UCSD.

Page1 / 9

VIS126 Final Note Summary - Northern Athapaskan Art...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online