6.4.3 Test (TST)_ Modernism and Language-2.pdf - Audrey...

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Audrey Nelson Mrs. Halstead AP English Language 21 January 2021 1. Short-response prompt (15 points) Read the following excerpt from the poem "Mending Wall" and the poem "Nothing Gold Can Stay" by Robert Frost: "Mending Wall" by Robert Frost Something there is that doesn't love a wall, That sends the frozen-ground-swell under it, And spills the upper boulders in the sun, And makes gaps even two can pass abreast. The work of hunters is another thing: I have come after them and made repair Where they have left not one stone on a stone, But they would have the rabbit out of hiding, To please the yelping dogs. The gaps I mean, No one has seen them made or heard them made, But at spring mending-time we find them there. (. . .) 'Why do they make good neighbors? Isn't it Where there are cows?
So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay. Compare and contrast the ways in which the author uses figurative language in both poems to convey tone. How does the tone in each poem differ? Be sure to include specific details from the texts to support your answer. In the second poem, the author conveys the idea of decay. He tells us that everything is beautiful and shining at the beginning, but that nothing can remain so for long. Everything decays, and nothing stays precious. This conveys a tone of sadness and inevitability. Both of the poems, “The Mending Wall” and “Nothing Gold Can Stay” use a wide variety of figurative language to establish the author’s tone and message. The tone of the two poems is significantly different, but they are similar in that they both use figurative language. To start off, the two poems both use a variety of metaphors. In “The Mending Wall,” perhaps the most important metaphor is the extended metaphor of the wall, representing the division in the relationship that exists between the speaker and his neighbor. Furthermore, Frost uses a metaphor when he says, “The work of hunters is another thing: / I have come after them and made repair” (Lines 5-6). The hunters are a metaphor for the speaker and the reader, as everyone is always trying to get something, even when people do not know what it is they are chasing. In Frost’s poem, “Nothing Gold Can Stay, he also uses metaphors as he writes “Nature's first green is gold,” (Line 1). He uses the idea of green in nature and shows that during spring, there is more “gold” than green, making nature seem more wondrous. Here, he also

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