Equilibrium_lab

Equilibrium_lab - Elliot Marshall Phys 103-04 Equilibrium...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Elliot Marshall Phys 103-04 February 28, 2008 Equilibrium Objective: To understand how the mathematics works behind two real world equilibriums and use that to predict the masses of two unknown objects. Apparatus: Wood plank, masses, two unknown masses, Force table, pulleys, strings, balance, meter stick, force probe, computer with Data Studio. Procedure: First we used a force table which was set up with three pulleys with three strings all attached to a ring in the center. We leveled out the force table and then moved a known weight to a known position on the force wheel, then moved an unknown weight to a known position on the force wheel, and then attempted to reach equilibrium by adjusting a third pulley to the right location with the right amount of weight to reach equilibrium. Then we tested the error of the third mass by adjusting the weight and position until equilibrium was disrupted in both directions, found out the maximum point and minimum point of equilibrium for mass and position, then used the middle point as the position and mass and the error was half of the difference of the maximum weight/position and the minimum weight/position. We did this for 5 different setups and recorded all the data. Then we did and experiment with the wood plank and force probe.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This lab report was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course PHYS 103L taught by Professor Nawashj during the Spring '08 term at Gonzaga.

Page1 / 5

Equilibrium_lab - Elliot Marshall Phys 103-04 Equilibrium...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online