Osteoarthritis 1.docx - Types of synovial joints Ball and...

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Types of synovial joints Ball and socket joint : In vertebrate anatomy, the ball-and-socket joint, also called the spheroidal joint, is a joint in which the rounded surface of a bone passes to another bone within a depression, providing greater freedom of mobility than any other form of joint. Swinging and spinning motions are provided by the ball and socket joint. The articulating bone is positioned in another bone's cavity, enabling the distal bone to travel along three major axes with a shared core. The joint has stabilising ligaments that control the direction and degree to which it is possible to move the bones. Movement can occur in three planes. This joint allows the greatest range of movement. Shoulder (head of humours with glenoid fossa of scapula) Hip (head of femur with acetabulum of pelvis). The joint where your femur meets your pelvis is your hip. There are two main parts: a ball that fits in a socket in the pelvis at the end of the femur. A ball-and-socket joint is known as the hip. This is because at the end of your femur, you have a ball and it fits into a socket in your pelvis. This makes it very stable for your hips and allows for a wide range of motion. It takes great force to harm them while they are safe. Playing sports, running, overuse or dropping, however, can often lead to hip injuries such as hip injuries. The Strains, with bursitis, Dislocations, Dislocations, fractures. Hip accidents or complications can lead to certain diseases. Pain and reduced motion can be caused by osteoarthritis. Hip osteoporosis causes fragile bones that quickly crack. In older individuals, both of these are normal. Treatment for hip disorders may include rest, medicines, physical therapy, or surgery, including hip replacement. Hinge: The hip hinge is a simple pattern of motion that allows you to perform important tasks such as bending over and picking up items. In many strength training exercises, it is also required, such as the deadlift, barbell hyperextension, straight-leg dumbbell deadlift, kettlebell swing, power clean, and more. Hinge joints operate in one plane with limited degrees of motion in other planes by allowing flexion and extension. An integral part of the dynamic biomechanics of the human body is the hinge joint. Significant quantities of force may be borne by the knee, elbow and ankle and aid in the success of work. Two or more bones with articular surfaces that are protected by hyaline cartilage and lubricated by synovial fluid form the hinge joint. Muscles, ligaments, and other connective tissues, such as the joint capsule, are responsible for stabilising each hinge joint. A cylindrical protrusion of one bone articulates with a trough- shaped depression of an adjacent bone. Movement is restricted to one plane. This joint allows bending and straightening only. Example ankle, knee and elbow.

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