Hamlet - critical theories.docx - 135 140 145 150 155 160 HAMLET O that this too too sullied flesh would melt Thaw and resolve itself into a dew Or that

Hamlet - critical theories.docx - 135 140 145 150 155 160...

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HAMLET O, that this too, too sullied flesh would melt, Thaw, and resolve itself into a dew, 135 Or that the Everlasting had not fixed His canon ’gainst self-slaughter! O God, God, How weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable Seem to me all the uses of this world! Fie on ’t, ah fie! ’Tis an unweeded garden 140 That grows to seed. Things rank and gross in nature Possess it merely. That it should come to this: But two months dead—nay, not so much, not two. So excellent a king, that was to this Hyperion to a satyr; so loving to my mother 145 That he might not beteem the winds of heaven Visit her face too roughly. Heaven and Earth, Must I remember? Why, she would hang on him As if increase of appetite had grown By what it fed on. And yet, within a month 150 (Let me not think on ’t; frailty, thy name is woman!), A little month, or ere those shoes were old With which she followed my poor father’s body, Like Niobe, all tears—why she, even she (O God, a beast that wants discourse of reason 155 Would have mourned longer!), married with my uncle, My father’s brother, but no more like my father Than I to Hercules. Within a month, Ere yet the salt of most unrighteous tears 160 Had left the flushing in her gallèd eyes, She married. O, most wicked speed, to post With such dexterity to incestuous sheets! It is not, nor it cannot come to good. But break, my heart, for I must hold my tongue. Notes: 133. Sullied: stained, defiled 136. canon: law 143. that was to this: i.e., that was, in comparison to this king (Claudius) 144. Hyperion to a satyr: i.e., like the sun god as compared to a goatlike satyr 145. might not beteem: would not allow 151. or ere: before 153. Niobe: In Greek mythology,Niobe, so grief-stricken at the loss of her children that she could not cease crying, was transformed into a stone from which water continually flowed. 154. wants...reason: lacks the ability to reason 160. Had...eyes: i.e., had stopped turning her eyes red 161. post: rush 162. Incestuous: Hamlet calls the marriage of his mother and his uncle “incestuous”—i.e., a violation of the laws against intercourse between close kin ....
Activity 1: When reading Shakespeare, a key strategy is to paraphrase his lines. Write the original lines that match the provided paraphrasing and the citation. 1. It hurts me to even remember how great my father was to my mother. “Hyperion to a satyr. So loving to my mother” (Line 140) My uncle is a lesser man than my father. “So excellent a king, that was to this 2. Hyperion to a satyr;”(Line 143) and My father’s brother, but no more like my father Than I to Hercules”(Line 157) The world seems useless to me . “How weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable 3. Seem to me all the uses of this world!”(Line 137) 4. I’m unable to say anything about my pain. “But break, my heart, for I must hold my tongue” (Line 164) 5. My father loved my mother so much that he wouldn’t even allow wind to blow too harshly on her face. “That he might not beteem the winds of heaven Visit her face too roughly.”(Line 145) 6. God has forbidden suicide. “Or that the Everlasting had not fixed/His canon ’gainst self- slaughter” 135-136 7. Even animals would have grieve longer than my mother.

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