Asian Conflicts - Melissa Wilkerson AMH1050 March 24, 2008...

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Melissa Wilkerson AMH1050 March 24, 2008 Who, What, When, Where, Why: The China Incident and U.S. Neutrality During Roosevelt’s first years as president, there was a troubled peace in East Asia. The Japanese wanted to keep “Asia for Asians” in their very own “Monroe Doctrine” style document. In response, President Roosevelt asked congress to build a stronger Navy and keep a fleet in the Pacific Ocean. However, in 1934 Congress passed the Tydings-McDuffe Act which guaranteed that the Philippines would become an independent nation in ten years. The U.S. was moving closer and closer to becoming an isolationist nation once again. By 1937, China and Japan had a conflict creating the Sino-Japanese war. Japan was trying to rid communism from Asia. The conflict had a climactic brawl in the middle of 1937 when Chinese and Japanese troops faced off at the Marco Polo Bridge becoming known as the “Chinese Incident”. When the U.S. heard about this many newspaper articles, movie news reels, and stories were spread about the Japanese terrorization in
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Asian Conflicts - Melissa Wilkerson AMH1050 March 24, 2008...

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