CA essay 2

CA essay 2 - Duncan 1 Caitlin Duncan November 19, 2007 CA...

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Duncan 1 Caitlin Duncan November 19, 2007 CA 101 – Bowman A Rising Epidemic In 2003, McDonald’s and Kraft Foods Inc. each spent $15 billion in marketing, aiming most of it towards children. Since 1980, child obesity has more than doubled to an astonishing 16 percent. An astonishing fact that not many people realize about today’s families is that parents spend $600 billion a year on what their child wants. Not only is this sort of thing happening at home, but schools are now offering foods from popular fast food restaurants like McDonald’s, KFC, and Pizza Hut as a quick solution to their decreasing budget. Every day, parents turn to fast food and microwave dinners instead of taking the time out of their busy schedules to fix a healthy homemade meal. Because of these quick fixes and changes in marketing, 10 percent of 2- to 5-year-olds and 15 percent of 6- to 19-year-olds are overweight today. Health experts predict that today’s younger generation will be the first to have poorer health outcomes and a shorter life expectancy then their parents. Why has this lifestyle suddenly become normal, and what is stopping it from changing? In order to cure America’s obesity epidemic, we must first identify all of its possible causes. Obese means that a person is so overweight that his or her health is in danger. This typically results when one’s Body Mass Index is 30 or higher. Body Mass Index (BMI) is combination of one’s height and weight to find percent body fat. This much body fat found in a child can be very harmful to their health and even fatal. It is commonly believed that overweight and poor dieting habits begin in infantry and/or adolescence, but it actually starts before birth.
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Duncan 2 Statistics show that the children of mothers who put on a “healthy amount of weight” (25-35 pounds) during pregnancy are actually four times as likely to be overweight or obese as children whose mothers put on less than the advised amount of weight (King, 37). A mother can never be too careful when caring for herself and her unborn child during pregnancy. A child’s likelihood of being overweight also greatly increases when one or more parents are overweight or obese. A parent’s dietary habits are passed down through his or her family. If a family member eats
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CA essay 2 - Duncan 1 Caitlin Duncan November 19, 2007 CA...

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