Puritans_Selfish_or_Selfless - Puritans Selfless or Selfish...

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Puritans: Selfless or Selfish? Background: The following writings are Primary Sources – original historical documents from the historical figures that composed them. Read each version thoughtfully, doing your best to understand the documents as the original audience would. As you read, remember your skills concerning how to “think like a historian.” Note who the author of each document is, what his profession is, who the original audience is, and, most importantly, what is the central message the author/speaker is hoping to convey. Part 1 – Biography Bits Briefly read the biographies of each of the historical figures below. You only need to have a general understanding of who each figure is, and their contributions to this significant historical event. Links to their biographies are located next to their names. John Cotton ( bio John Winthrop ( bio ) Updated: September 24, 2020 1
Part 2 – Primary Sources Read the following historical documents a minimum of three times each. For one of the readings, have someone in your group read each documents aloud. The versions of the documents in the handwriting- style font are the actual historical words spoken. As you read/listen, attempt to ascertain the main point the author/speaker is making. Things to think about: Who the original audience was; When the speech was given; The occasion for the speech; and Where the speech was delivered. Document A: ‘City upon a Hill’ (ORIGINAL) Now the only way to avoid this shipwreck, and to provide for our posterity, is to follow the counsel of Micah, to do justly, to love mercy, to walk humbly with our God. For this end, we must be knit together, in this work, as one man. We must entertain each other in brotherly affection. We must be willing to abridge ourselves of our superfluities, for the supply of others’ necessities. We must uphold a familiar commerce together in all meekness, gentleness, patience and liberality. We must delight in each other; make others’ conditions our own; rejoice together, mourn together, labor and suffer together, always having before our eyes our commission and community in the work, as members of the same body.

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