lecture3F06

lecture3F06 - Learning goals: Lecture 3, Biological...

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Land Plants I- how land plants colonized land (Ch. 29) Land plants evolved from green algae; terrestrial adaptations; alternation of generations; bryophytes dominated by gametophyte generation; ferns dominated by sporophyte Learning goals: Lecture 3, Biological Diversity (Plants and Fungi) Readings: Chapters 29, 30, and 31 (read all of these, but the parts covered in lecture are most likely to be on a test ). Land plants II - Seed plants (Ch.30) Tiny gametophytes protected in ovules and pollen; advantages of seeds; Gymnosperms have “naked seeds”; Angiosperms have seeds in fruits; Monocots, Eudicots Fungi (Ch. 31) Characteristics ; fungi reproduce by spores; fungal origins and relationships; importance
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A particular group of green algae, called charyophyceans, seem to be the closest living species to a possible land plant ancestor. Two genera of charyophyceans are shown in Fig. 29.3. Several unique features are shared between charyophyceans and land plants. Land Plants (Ch. 29) land plants evolved from green algae terrestrial adaptations alternation of generations bryophtes mostly gametophyte ferns mostly sporophyte Back to Lecture 2 for a moment - the key to understanding the evolution of land plants lies in the very diverse green algae. Fig. 28.3 Note that some are rather “plant-like in appearance.
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Two important (of several) derived features of all true plants are an apical meristerm (area of growth at the tips of shoots and roots), and alternation of generations . Fig. 29.5 Land Plants (Ch. 29) land plants evolved from green algae terrestrial adaptations alternation of generations bryophtes mostly gametophyte ferns mostly sporophyte Apical meristem allows plants to grow down into the soil for nutrients and up to the light.
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Fig. 29.5 Land Plants (Ch. 29) land plants evolved from green algae terrestrial adaptations alternation of generations bryophtes mostly gametophyte ferns mostly sporophyte Alternation of generations should not be confused with just sexual reproduction. Alteration of generations means that in a species there is both a haploid organism with many differentiated cells, and a diploid organism with many differentiated cells. The sporophyte generation is not dependent on water to reproduce. Note that syngamy = fertilization when there are differentiated eggs and sperm.
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Land Plants (Ch. 29) land plants evolved from green algae terrestrial adaptations alternation of generations bryophtes mostly gametophyte ferns mostly sporophyte Bryophytes are the mosses and plants like them. Fig. 29.8 is terrible , with far more detail than you need to know! Let’s go through what you do need to know, step by step.
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land plants evolved from green algae terrestrial adaptations alternation of generations bryophtes mostly gametophyte ferns mostly sporophyte Start at the top. The moss plants you see in the woods are gametophytes (haploid plants). Some are male, and some are female. Male gametophytes make sperm, and female gametophytes male
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lecture3F06 - Learning goals: Lecture 3, Biological...

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