The mo and signature behaviors can also provide

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Unformatted text preview: he other two individuals. Computer Criminal Behavior Like traditional criminals, computer criminals have a specific modus operandi (MO). In other words, criminals use a distinct method of operation to carry out their crime that can be used to help identify them. The difference with computer crimes is that the investigator, obviously, must have knowledge of technology. For example, an MO for computer criminals may include the use of specific hacking tools, or targeting specific systems or networks. The method usually involves repetitive signature behaviors, such as sending e-mail messages or programming syntax. Knowledge of the criminal’s MO and signature behaviors can be useful throughout the investigative process. Law enforcement can use the information to identify other offenses by the same criminal, for example. The MO and signature behaviors can also provide information that is useful during the interview and interrogation process as well as the trial. Psychological crime scene analysis (profiling) can also be conducted using the criminal’s MO and signature behaviors. Profiling provides insight into the thought processes of the attacker and can be used to identify the attacker or, at the very least, the tool he used to conduct the crime. N OTE NOTE Locard’s Principle of Exchange also provides information that is handy for profiling. The principle states that a criminal leaves something behind and takes something with them. This principle is the foundation of criminalistics. Even in an entirely digital crime scene, Locard’s Principle of Exchange can shed light on who the perpetrator(s) may be. Incident Investigators Incident investigators are a breed of their own. Many people suspect they come from a different planet, but to date that hasn’t been proven. Good incident investigators must be aware of suspicious or abnormal activities that others might normally ignore. This is because, due to their training and experience, they may know what is potentially going ch10.indd ch10...
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This note was uploaded on 06/01/2013 for the course NET 125 taught by Professor Hurst during the Fall '12 term at Wake Tech.

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