SOC0005_Week02

SOC0005_Week02 - SOC 0005 - Week 2 Turner Chapter 5...

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Page 1 BABONES 2006 SOC 0005 - Week 2 Turner Chapter 5 Salvatore J. Babones Department of Sociology University of Pittsburgh Copyright 2007
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Page 2 BABONES 2006 Turner Chapter 5 - Culture
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Page 3 BABONES 2006 VALUES, BELIEFS, AND NORMS ARE MAJOR ELEMENTS OF CULTURE • VALUES represent overarching moral principles BELIEFS represent people’s contextual ideas about appropriate outcomes in particular situations • NORMS represent people’s actual behaviors in social situations
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Page 4 BABONES 2006 MOST WORLD CULTURES SHARE A CORE HUMAN VALUE SET • All cultures value the sanctity of human life All major world religions value peace, neighborliness, and charity toward the poor • A recent article in Science magazine (Oct. 2005) demonstrated that values were near-identical among college students in 49 countries
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Page 5 BABONES 2006 MOST WORLD CULTURES SHARE A CORE HUMAN VALUE SET
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Page 6 BABONES 2006 MOST WORLD CULTURES SHARE A CORE HUMAN VALUE SET
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Page 7 BABONES 2006 MOST WORLD CULTURES SHARE A CORE HUMAN VALUE SET
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Page 8 BABONES 2006 VALUE SETS DO DIFFER ACROSS COUNTRIES THOUGH (INGLEHART) • The two dimensions graphed explain over 70% of all measured cultural variation across ten major indicators of culture • The vertical axis represents tradition versus modernity The horizontal axis represents desire for individual expression
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Page 9 BABONES 2006 THE BIGGEST DIFFERENCES AMONG VALUE SETS MAINLY APPEAR BETWEEN RICH AND POOR COUNTRIES • These tables report the percentage of people who value certain qualities in children Residents of rich countries tend to value imagination in children • Residents of poor countries tend to value obedience
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course SOC 0005 taught by Professor Babones during the Spring '08 term at Pittsburgh.

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SOC0005_Week02 - SOC 0005 - Week 2 Turner Chapter 5...

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