SC5SN - Chapter 5 Producing Data Chapter 5 Producing Data...

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Chapter 5: Producing Data Chapter 5: Producing Data Objectives: Students will: Distinguish between, and discuss the advantages of, observational studies and experiments . Identify and give examples of different types of sampling methods, including a clear definition of a simple random sample . Identify and give examples of sources of bias in sample surveys. Identify and explain the three basic principles of experimental design . Explain what is meant by a complete randomized design . Distinguish between the purposes of randomization and blocking in an experimental design. Use random numbers from a table or technology to select a random sample. AP Outline Fit: II. Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and conducting a study (10%–15%) A. Overview of methods of data collection 1. Census 2. Sample survey 3. Experiment 4. Observational study B. Planning and conducting surveys 1. Characteristics of a well-designed and well-conducted survey 2. Populations, samples, and random selection 3. Sources of bias in sampling and surveys 4. Sampling methods, including simple random sampling, stratified random sampling, and cluster sampling C. Planning and conducting experiments 1. Characteristics of a well-designed and well-conducted experiment 2. Treatments, control groups, experimental units, random assignments, and replication 3. Sources of bias and confounding, including placebo effect and blinding 4. Completely randomized design 5. Randomized block design, including matched pairs design What you will learn: A. SAMPLING 1. Identify the population in a sampling situation. 2. Recognize bias due to voluntary response sampling and other inferior sampling methods. 3. Select a simple random sample (SRS) from a population. 4. Recognize cluster sampling and how it differs from other sampling methods. 5. Recognize the presence of undercoverage and nonresponse as sources of error in a sample survey. Recognize the effect of the wording of questions on the response. 6. Use random digits to select a stratified random sample from a population when the strata are identified. B. EXPERIMENTS 1. Recognize whether a study is an observational study or an experiment. 2. Recognize bias due to confounding of explanatory variables with lurking variables in either an observational study or an experiment. 3. Identify the factors (explanatory variables), treatments, response variables, and experimental units or subjects in an experiment. 4. Outline the design of a completely randomized experiment using a diagram like those in Examples 5.17 (page 360) and 5.19 (page 362). The diagram in a specific case should show the sizes of the groups, the specific treatments, and the response variable(s). 5. Carry out the random assignment of subjects to groups in a completely randomized experiment. 6. Recognize the placebo effect. Recognize when the double-blind technique should be used.
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